Bambaram

Bambaram

Bambaram is a Badju di Tina (Drum Dance) group, a musical genre from Guinea Bissau centred on the sound of a cabasa played suspended in a drum of water.
Dance and song is summoned by the deep sound of this drum to celebrate important moments in life together.

Sung in Creole, Badju di Tina focuses on events from everyday life, social and political criticism, love and emotions.
Flowing above the rhythms struck on the cabasa, the songs develop in a question-answer pattern between a soloist and a choir.
The “palmas” – small wooden planks played by each choir member – are the other rhythm instruments used.
In the middle of the space defined by the choir, people dance alone or together.

In Guinea, Bambaram is the word that means the cloth slings mothers use for carrying children around while they do their everyday chores.
The symbolic nature of this cloth was behind the choice of name for the group: Those who share the same bambaram are brothers and sisters, as are those who participate in thisBambaram.

Created in the early 1980s by Guineans of the Papel ethnic group, living in the former Quinta do Mocho (Sacavém) and almost exclusively composed by women, Bambaram is regularly invited to ceremonies and parties organised by the Guinean community of Greater Lisbon.
The group has also performed at the Belém Cultural Centre, the Aula Magna in Lisbon, the São Luiz and Maria Matos Theatres, B. Leza, and the opening show for the 2014 Lisbon Festivities.